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in the city were paying less taxes than their cleaners and the government has sorted out. >> not to be remembered as the prime minister introduced regulation of the press, an essential part of a free democracy. would you agree with me that regulation derives -- you are pregnant or not pregnant. you either have state regulation or you don't. there is no alternative third way. >> i would agree with my hon. friend. is it a free press? absolutely vital for free democracy? we should recognize all the press has done and should continue to do to uncover wrongdoing, stand up to the powerful. whatever changes we make we want a robust and free press in our country. >> research by the charity save the children, reveals shockingly that in our country when seven children does not have a warm coat this winter. the government is cutting child benefits support to 100,000 families who look out for disabled children. whenever our views on how our economic problems were brought about, surely it cannot be right that the poorest and most vulnerable hay -- [shouting] >> the point i make is we
civil. you want to get married, you go down to city hall and you to get a license. if the property arrangement. the concept of marriage in this country is so overlaid, with religious dimensions of it. i think that my thoughts are, you know, they are not really about the current political movement in this country. the degree to which we are an extremely conservative religious sense of marriage and family -- it isn't just about the moynihan report. it isn't just about blacks and single mothers getting married. it was a moment that we have lost in the women's movement where you could, you know, have a life of chosen partners dividing property for the sake of very specific purposes of certain kind of benefits. but it was a little bit beside the point. if you want a religious endowment god's blessing, you know, you go and get married. i do see marriage. i see it as a kind of property transfer. i also think when you think of it as a civil union, it clarifies other things, like the lack of benefits we have generally. the lack of them in society. i am so concerned about this argument of pe
as of last year, more people live in cities. and that trend is accelerating. and if you look at great societies in places like africa, what does that mean for us in terms of demographics, in terms of resources? i think these changes are going to accelerate, and we need to be better prepared for that across the board. so those are sort of three large, general chunks that i think we should focus on. >> focus a little tighter for a minute. >> uh-huh. >> you have been quoted as saying that there are very likely as many or more spies working against u.s. interests inside the u.s. as there were during the cold war. >> yeah. >> which was a head-snapping quote when i read it. who are these people? and what are they after? >> well, i don't know that. that's my best guess. >> yeah, a guess. >> i've been out of government for six years, but if you look at the value of intelligence, the importance of intelligence, and then you look at the expenditures and the resources by china, by russia, by others -- >> uh-huh. >> -- and what for them is one of their biggest concerns? well, it's the u.s. and no
and the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the cities of paris. q. and a sunday night at eight on c-span.
is spending $234 million on a site to the west -- 20 kilometers west of the center city of kabul to be known as the afghan national defense university. this is a complex which allows a number of schools. one b. the academy sponsored by this country. as the national military academy of afghanistan, which is very much the op sir training based on the west point model. the major academy will be based and on the basis that is developing relatively junior to middle ranking leadership, that is a huge investment and one i was enormously courage by as they watched it develop. that won't fully be in operation until the end of 2013 when it's do or where the officers academy will take us for scores. >> can you say something about how the generational change processor describing cubs are insisting the future forces faced with the reconstruction of reconciliation process because there is a worry some express about people coming back. but they're coming back with expect patience and are being put back into a process. is there any conflict between these processes and how is that working with the present st
in the government and corporate and nonprofit sectors, including the city government of washington tv and the national mental health association and the national alliance on mental illness where she served as a chief operating officer. she is an ordained minister and she most recently served in the community of washington. seated next to her is patricia williams, professor of law at kobe university and she writes the monthly diary of a mad law professor column. she is the author of several books, including most recently, a family friend, and the search for the rim of my own. which is a personal collection of stories and anecdotes and biographies. next to professor williams is rebecca tracer. many of you may recognize her from her many television appearances. she's the author of big girls don't cry, the election that changed everything for american women's. she writes about politics and gender and has contributed to the new york observer, "the new york times", vogue, and among many other publications. please join me in welcoming her this afternoon. [applause] thank you all for coming.
that rebellion centered in the city of hamas and killed, according to the claims of the regimes, 38,000 people in a 27-day campaign in the months of february in 1982. the people felt if they back off, they would be punished because in the 80s, after 82, the next following years, they punishedded them collectively, about 80,000 forcibly disappeared people whose files are still not closed, and thousands and thousands of prisoners of conscious. the syrians felt they have to continue at any cost. when help doesn't come, the idea of defense formed in the movement itself, and so those soldiers defecting from the army started creating small groups to defend, in fact, initially what they called the peacefulness of the revolution, and so they went around buildings because that's where snipers used to shoot peaceful protesters, but as an author said, defense is the first act of war. what happened is that in order to achieve this defense of civilians, the small groups, which increasingly also became joined by civilians who took up arms to defend the towns, families, and suburbs, started, actually, engagi
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7